© Copyright 2010-2015
© Copyright 2010-2016

Hebrews 2:10-13
By Brother Mike (2-19-16; 40 minutes)
   


10 For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings .
11
For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren
12 Saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee .
13
And again, I will put my trust in him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me .  


INTRODUCTION   

In Hebrews 2 verses 10-13 we are given the reason as to why it was fitting for Him (Yahweh), for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, to have made the captain or author of the elect's salvation (Jesus Christ) complete or perfect through sufferings. It was because both He that sanctifies (Yahweh) and they who are sanctified (the elect and Jesus Christ) are all one. This is why He (Christ) is not ashamed to call them (the elect) brethren, saying, I (Jesus Christ) will declare thy name (Yahweh's name) unto my brethren (the elect), in the midst of the church (the elect) will I (Jesus Christ) sing praise unto thee (Yahweh). And again, I (Jesus Christ) will put my trust in him (Yahweh). And again, Behold I (Jesus Christ) and the children (the elect) which God (Yahweh) has given me (Jesus Christ). 


Verse 2:10

10 For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings .  

In this verse we first read, For it became him; that is, it became [Yahweh]. The verb it became is in the imperfect tense, which means that the action of this verb is continuous, or over and over again, and it took place over an extended period of time in the past (see Imperfect Tense ). So, it became God continuously over an extended period of time in the past in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. The conjunction For in the sentence, For it became him, tells us why we read in the previous verse 9 that Jesus was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death: it was because, as we read in our new verse 10, it became Yahweh [over and over again, over a period of time in the past] . . . in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings (verse 10).  

Now, we already read, For it became Yahweh [ongoingly over a period of time in the past], and then we now read, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things. Here, we discover that all things were not only made by Yahweh, but they were also made for Yahweh. In other words, Yahweh (Christ) not only created all things, but all things were created for the purposes of Yahweh. Therefore, we can know without question that everything in this life has a purpose from the smallest virus to the largest whale in the sea, from the smallest atom to all the trillions of planets in the cosmos. Everything, without exception, has a purpose, and, therefore, everything has a reason to be present even though we as finite beings may not comprehend all the reasons, but we can at least know that there are reasons, for everything, and this gives us comfort. For we know that we came into being not by blind chance as the evolutionist must believe, but we came into existence with purpose, and that purpose is whatever Yahweh made it to be. And, for the elect, that purpose is to follow His Word; never to die, but to live with Yahweh forever; where there is no sorrow or sadness; no pain; no sin, no death, but glory and bliss in a new heaven and earth for all eternity. Amen.  

Again, all things are for Yahweh and His purposes. The light was made to reveal the darkness. The light shown into the darkness, but the darkness comprehended it not. The darkness preferred darkness, for the light revealed that the darkness was naked. So the darkness fled from the light, and hid from the light. But, the light shown into the darkness, and some of the darkness became light. Then the light shown further into the darkness, and more of the darkness became light. Then this light shown even further into the darkness, and even more of the darkness became light. And, this process of transforming some of the darkness into light continued right on up until May 21, 2011 when the light shown no more into the darkness. So, ever since, the world has been in deep darkness, and how deep is that darkness? But, finally, the darkness will vanish, and there will be nothing but light, Yahweh and His elect for all eternity in a new heaven and earth where only light exists. 

Now, getting back to our verse, we read, For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings . The first part of the verse, For it became Him, can be more literally translated, For it was fitting to Him, or, For it stood out to Him. So, our verse can now read,    

10 For it was fitting to Him [over and over again in the past]. . . in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings

The preposition, in, in the phrase, in bringing many sons unto glory does not appear in the original Greek, and the verb participle bringing is in the Aorist tense, which means that the action of the verb participle bringing took place at a point in the past (see Aorist tense ). So, our verse now reads,  

10 For it was fitting to Him [over and over again in the past]. . . having brought many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings .  

Furthermore, the verb infinitive, to make perfect in the prepositional phrase, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings is once again in the Aorist tense, which means the action of the verb is at a point in the past. So, our verse now reads, 

10 For it was fitting to Him [over and over again in the past] . . . having brought many sons unto glory, to have made the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings

Now, the word captain in the phrase, captain of their salvation means inaugurator, originator, or author of their salvation. So our verse can now read,   

10 For it was fitting to Him [over and over again in the past] . . . having brought many sons unto glory, to have made the author of their salvation perfect through sufferings

The idea of having been made perfect is that of having been made complete; that is, Yahweh's plan for Christ was perfected or completed after Christ suffered as a man, died, and rose from the dead. Through this process, Christ was made perfect, for He completed Yahweh's predestined plan for Himself. We could say that Christ reached His full maturity, perfection, or completeness through sufferings by becoming a man who was a little lower than the angels, and suffering the shame of death on a cross in the place of His elect so that they would not likewise ever have to suffer. And, this was fitting to Yahweh to have done things this way as it brought many sons unto glory. Indeed, the sufferings of Christ as a man from conception to death on a cross guaranteed that all his elect would have their heavy debt of sin paid for, and that they too, therefore, as Christ, would be resurrected from the dead to life everlasting in glory. In this sense, Yahweh brought many sons [the elect] unto glory.  

Notice that our verse does not say that Christ's sufferings as a man brought every human being unto glory, but it brought many sons only unto glory. In other words, Christ's sufferings did not atone for the sins of every human being, but only for the sins of the many sons (the elect) who were brought unto glory. Indeed, the sufferings of Christ did not guarantee the salvation of every human being, but they guaranteed the salvation of the elect who are but a remnant of the whole, and who are blessed forever, amen. 

Now, let's consider that it was through sufferings that Christ was made perfect since we too are in the process of being made perfect through sufferings. Yes, like Christ, we as human beings have been made a little lower than the angels, and like mirror images of Christ, we are suffering in this world until all Christ's enemies have been subdued under His feet. Then, we, too, will be lifted up in new glorious and heavenly bodies to continue our rule and reign with Christ in the new heaven and earth forever. But, until that time, we are undergoing various trials and sufferings of one kind or another. Yet, we are encouraged in that Christ who now dwells in the heavenlies has already suffered on our behalf, and so He knows how to come to our aid in the time of need, for His sufferings were greater than ours in that He suffered the pain of eternal death for the many so that each one of them would only have to suffer for a short time in this world under the loving care of their Savior, Jesus Christ. Then, once we have finished our sojourn of suffering in this world, we will reign with Christ forevermore in a new world, for we read in 2Corinthians 5:8,  

2Co 5:8 We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord


Verse 2:11
:   

11 For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren . . .  

In this verse, we are given the reason why it was fitting to God . . . having brought many sons unto glory, to have made the author of their salvation [Jesus Chris] perfect through sufferings: it was because, as we read, both he that sanctifies and they who are sanctified are all of one. In other words, he that sanctifies [Yahweh] and they who are sanctified [the elect and Christ] are all of one. But, in what way are God, the elect, and Christ all of one? One way in which they are all of one is that they were all made to be human beings as Yahweh was made flesh to be the Christ and human beings, of course, were made of flesh as well. So, yes, we can say that they are all one as human beings.   

But, there is a much more profound way in which Yahweh, the elect, and Christ are one, and that, of course, is in the Spirit. Once an elect person has been spiritually saved (born from above), they have become spiritually united to Christ by the Spirit even as Christ is united to the Father, Yahweh. We read,  

Ro 12:5 So we [the elect], being many, are one body in Christ, and every one members one of another .

And, again, we read, 

1Co 10:17 For we [the elect] being many are one bread, and one body: for we are all partakers of that one bread [Christ]

And, then, we read, 

Joh 17:22 And the glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one . . . 

And, again, in John 10, we read,  

Joh 10:30 I [Christ] and my Father are one

And, finally, we read  

1Jo 5:7 For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word [Christ], and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one .  

So, the Father, Christ, and the Holy Spirit are all one. And, in that the elect have all been spiritually united in Christ, so they also are all one with Christ who is all one with the Father who is all one with the Holy Spirit who is all one with the Father and Christ who are all one with the elect, which means the entire Godhead - the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit - are all one with the elect. And, herein is a divine mystery: that the elect are all one with Yahweh. This must mean that Yahweh can feel every infirmity, every pain, every fear and anxiety, every sadness and sorrow, everything that we as His elect experience, so there is no one more understanding and able to help in time of need. Indeed, He knows what we need before we even pray, and the Holy Spirit helps us with our infirmities as we read in Romans 8,

Ro 8:26 Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered .   

Now, returning to our verse, it is because of this oneness that the elect have with Christ and Yahweh that we read, for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren. That is, since the elect are spiritually united with Christ and are, in fact, His body, He [Christ] is not ashamed to call them brethren. After all, the elect are spiritually a part of who Christ is; so how can He deny those who are His own body? To do so would be to deny Himself. For how can He say that His leg is not His leg. Or, His arm is not His arm. Or, be gone from me O feet, for I do not need you. Clearly, He cannot because the elect are so intimately united with Him, and the elect are humans even as Christ was made human. And, because of all of this, He is not ashamed to call them brethren.    

Interestingly, the verb is ashamed in the sentence He is not ashamed to call them brethren is in the Middle Voice, which means that He is not ashamed [in His own interest] to call them brethren (see Middle Voice ). Now, why would it be in Christ's own interest to not be ashamed to call the elect brethren? Well, the answer is, because the elect are such an intimate part of Him. And, He cannot deny Himself. So, it is obviously in His own interest to not be ashamed to call the elect brethren, for not to do so would be to deny Himself, which is impossible for God to do. Isn't it wonderful how the Greek language exemplifies a given text?  


Verse 2:12

12 Saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee .

The first thing to note about this verse is that it is a Psalm of King David, which states the very same thing. It reads, 

Ps 22:22 I will declare thy name unto my brethren: in the midst of the congregation will I praise thee

In this Psalm, it is King David who says, I will declare thy name unto my brethren: in the midst of the congregation will I praise thee. But, in Hebrews 2:12, it is Christ who says, I will declare thy name unto my brethren: in the midst of the congregation will I praise thee. How can this be? Why this can be because Psalm 22 is actually a messianic Psalm wherein David typifies Christ. Therefore, it was not King David who came up with the words of Psalm 22, but it was Christ through David by which these words were spoken. The writer of Hebrews is seeing this deeper understanding of the text, which is that Christ is the one who actually declared these words, saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren: in the midst of the congregation will I praise thee

Now, just what name is it that Christ will declare unto His brethren? Obviously, it is the name of God. And, since we have learned long ago that God's personal name is Yahweh, the name that Christ will declare among His brethren is Yahweh, the Almighty, the everlasting one who had no beginning, and who has no end, and who is manifest as three persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, but who is one Lord and one God, mystery of all mystery, amen. 

Next, our verse states, in the midst of the church will I [Christ] praise thee. The word translated as church is the Greek word ekklesia. It can refer to a local gathering of Christians wherein some are the elect while others are not, but, in its broadest sense and the way it must be taken in this Day of Judgment wherein the Church Age has long ended, is to take it as referring to all the elect worldwide; they as a whole are the eternal church of Yahweh. So, when it says, in the midst of the Church will Christ praise Yahweh, it means that Christ will praise Yahweh in the midst of the elect worldwide. In fact, Christ actually praises Yahweh through the elect by the Holy Spirit, which means that when our verse says, in the midst of the church will Christ praise Yahweh, it is one and the same as the elect, the body of Christ, praising Yahweh, for it is the Spirit working through the elect to praise the Father, Yahweh. So, Christ not only praises Yahweh through the Spirit, but so do the elect. And, this can all be understood as Christ praising Yahweh, which means that Christ who is Yahweh praises Yahweh. That is, God praises God, and there is no egotism in this because God is the greatest being that will ever be. Therefore, He alone is worthy of all praise from His creation as well as even from Himself without any egotism involved whatsoever. 


Verse 2:13

13 And again, I will put my trust in him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me .

Now, in this verse, we read, And again, I will put my trust in him. The sentence, I will put my trust in him is thought to have been taken from 2Samuel 22 where David says these words in a song after Yahweh had delivered him from his enemies. It states,

2Sa 22:3 The God of my rock; in him will I trust: he is my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my high tower, and my refuge, my saviour; thou savest me from violence .

But, our verse in Hebrews does not teach that David said these words, but it insists that Christ said, I will put my trust in him. This is because David was being used as a type of Christ, and we are to see through David to the deeper meaning, which is Christ saying, I will put my trust in him. And, since the context of 2Samuel 22:3 is that of David having been delivered from his enemies when he then says through song, in Him will I trust, the context of Hebrews 2:13 when Christ says, I will put my trust in Him, must be after Christ was delivered from His enemies upon His resurrection from the dead. This is when Christ in a spiritual sense would put to song the same words that David did in 2Samuel 22:3, namely in Him will I trust, or, as Hebrews 2:13 records it, I will put my trust in Him.

Now, let's look more closely at the Greek of the sentence, I will put my trust in Him. Literally, the sentence reads, I will be trusting in Him. The participle, trusting is in the perfect tense, which means that the action of trusting was completed in the past - we can reason that this was when Christ conquered all His enemies by resurrection from the dead - and this completed act of trusting results in Christ continuing to trust in Him unto the present (see Perfect Tense ). So, when Christ says, I will put my trust in Him, it all started back when Christ faced going through the pains of death as a man; when Christ trusted Yahweh that all His enemies would be eventually conquered. The result of that trusting is that He was rescued from all His enemies, including death, and He now continues to trust in Yahweh for obvious good reasons.

Next, our verse states, And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me. The word Behold is actually a command, and it means to be perceiving what follows; that is, pay attention or tune in because of what is about to be said, which is, as was already said, I and the children which God hath given me. This verse, I and the children which God hath given me, is focusing in on the real oneness that Christ and the elect possess. In fact, it is difficult to mention Christ without also mentioning the elect, and it is difficult to mention the elect without mentioning Christ. They are so inextricably connected; they are one. As we have already seen, spiritually speaking, the elect are the body of Christ, and Christ is the head of that body. And, just as our bodies cannot function without a head to command it to do its various deeds, so also the head all alone cannot accomplish every deed without its body. So, because of this oneness, we begin to understand why Christ says, Behold, I and the children which God hath given me.

Now, our verse, Behold I and the children which God has given me, is a quote from Isaiah 8:18 where we read,

18 Behold, I and the children whom the LORD hath given me are for signs and for wonders in Israel from the LORD of hosts, which dwelleth in mount Zion .

The context of this verse (Isaiah 8:1-18) is the destruction of Israel by the Assyrians which we know was a type of the spiritual destruction brought upon the churches beginning in 1988 and ending on May 21, 2011, and right in the midst of this context Isaiah says, Behold, I and the children whom the LORD hath given me. But, if it was Isaiah who said these words, how can these words have been attributed to Christ in our verse of Hebrews 2:13? Well, just as king David was a type of Christ, so is Isaiah here a type of Christ. The writer of Hebrews is seeing the deeper understanding of these words by seeing that what Isaiah said here is really what Christ said through him. It is Christ who says, Behold, I and the children whom the Yahweh has given me.

Of particular interest is that we are told that I and the children whom the LORD hath given me are for signs and for wonders in Israel from the LORD of hosts, which dwelleth in mount Zion. What does it mean that the children (elect) are for signs and wonders in Israel from Yahweh of hosts? It seems to me that since these things are said in the context of judgment upon the churches (read Isaiah 8:1-18), Yahweh is revealing to us that the elect are signs and wonders (miracles) because how can they even exist in the context of the complete destruction of the churches? Shouldn't they also have been destroyed because they, also, were members of the churches (Israel)? No, they are each signs and wonders (miracles) in the sense that they survived the devastation of the churches, and, as we know, they eventually came out of all the churches in obedience to the Lord's command (see Why Leave All Churches? ).

Now, before we conclude this study, it should be mentioned that the verb translated as has given in the verse, Behold I and the children which God hath given me is actually in the Aorist Tense of the Greek, which means that the action of God giving the elect to Christ took place at some point in the past, and our verse should be translated,

13 . . . And again, Behold I and the children which God gave me .

The idea is that the children (the elect) that God gave to Christ were given at some point in the past. We know that this was some time before the foundation of the world because the scriptures reveal that the elect were predestined before the foundation of the world as we read in Ephesians 1,

Eph 1: Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ :
4 According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love :
5 Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will . . .

And, again, we read,

Ro 8:30 Moreover whom he did predestinate [the elect], them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified .

So, it is clear that Yahweh, the Father, gave the elect to Christ before the world began through having predestined them unto glory.

Now, there is more that we could say about this verse such as why the children are referring to the elect, and so on, but, for most, I think that this is obvious. So let's stop here.


CONCLUSION  

What we have found in Hebrews 2 verses 10-13 is that the reason why it was fitting to Yahweh over and over again in the past, having brought the elect unto glory, to have made the author of the elect�s salvation (Jesus Christ) perfect through sufferings was because both Yahweh that sanctifies and the elect and Christ who are sanctified are all of one, which is why Christ is not ashamed to call the elect brethren, saying, I (Jesus Christ) will declare Yahweh unto my elect, in the midst of the elect will I sing praise unto Yahweh. And again, I (Jesus Christ) will put my trust in Yahweh. And again, Behold I (Jesus Christ) and the elect which God (Yahweh) hath given me. 


Now, to the true elect of Yahweh, may the LORD bless thee, and keep thee: The LORD make his face shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee: The LORD lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace .

2:1-4 
2:5-9 
2:10-13 
2:14-18  
3:1-6 

aaaaaaaaaaaaiii